Bigfoot, JFK, And The Art Of Dissecting Video-Evidence

“I don’t mind being wrong, but I don’t want to fail to be right.”
— M.K. Davis, Interview Extract
 M.K. Davis at Bluff Creek. Photo courtesy of thedavisreport.wordpress.com.

M.K. Davis at Bluff Creek. Photo courtesy of thedavisreport.wordpress.com.

M.K. Davis claims that he is not an expert when it comes to Bigfoot – however, if 18 years of ardent research into the Patterson-Gimlin film, alongside extensive travelling and trekking of the Bluff Creek area (where the footage was shot), doesn’t make you an expert, then I don’t know what does. Hopefully Mr. Davis can at least concede that he is an expert on the Patterson-Gimlin film and most certainly a seasoned Bigfoot hunter.

Then there’s also his intense research into the JFK assassination, specifically the video evidence that captures the actual assassination and the assassin(s) – respectively the Abraham Zapruder film and the Orville Nix film. Once again, M.K. Davis emphasises that he is not a JFK expert, nor a professional conspiracy theorist; though we may not agree, we appreciate Davis’ sincere modesty in this, because we all know that there are far too many people out there that do claim expertise where it isn’t justified (especially when it comes to conspiratorial subjects). So it’s refreshing to speak to someone that claims to know exactly what they know.

“I guess what I’m saying is that it’s a bigger stretch to believe that only one man wreaked all that havoc, than it would be to believe that it was a conspiracy.”
— M.K. Davis, Article Extract from The Davis Report

Two very contrasting topics, certainly – perhaps you’re asking yourself why M.K. Davis decided to study the JFK assassination films? As we can tell by now, Davis likes to focus on tangible evidence, not merely myths and theories – it clearly makes sense that he should focus on those subjects where video evidence exists. What makes him think that researching JFK is worthwhile though, as opposed to other “conspiracy theories”? I don’t think I could answer it better myself, so allow me to quote Davis directly from his website: “I guess what I’m saying is that it’s a bigger stretch to believe that only one man wreaked all that havoc, than it would be to believe that it was a conspiracy.” In summary, then, he chooses to study topics and theories when the evidence presented makes it more likely to be true than false – alas, simple and brilliant reasoning.

 A stabilised frame in gif format, taken from the Patterson-Gimlin film. Courtesy of M.K. Davis. Source: tinyurl.com/zhjapp3

A stabilised frame in gif format, taken from the Patterson-Gimlin film. Courtesy of M.K. Davis. Source: tinyurl.com/zhjapp3

Davis’ talent lies in analysing and modifying video evidence. Some of his recent blog posts present us with skillfully stabilised footage of both the Patterson-Gimlin film (right), the Orville Nix film, as well as his own possible Sasquatch footage, notably the Bluff Creek Croucher video (which since has been written about by several newspapers and websites). For those of you that have seen some of this footage, you’ll know that stabilising wobbly videos makes a huge difference, and is certainly not an easy task. His observations are meticulous, and he has a masterly ability to pick out details that the average human brain probably wouldn’t notice. It wouldn’t do Mr. Davis justice to merely talk about his explorations, so I urge everyone reading this (at least for the sake of this article and further clarification) to have a quick scroll through some of his blog posts, which can be found on his Wordpress site.

 An interesting panorama of the JFK assassination, constructed by M.K. Davis from the Orville Nix film. Courtesy of M.K. Davis. Source: tinyurl.com/hpwl769

An interesting panorama of the JFK assassination, constructed by M.K. Davis from the Orville Nix film. Courtesy of M.K. Davis. Source: tinyurl.com/hpwl769

 A close-up of the Bigfoot “snot wad.” Courtesy of M.K. Davis. Source: tinyurl.com/jlrmcks

A close-up of the Bigfoot “snot wad.” Courtesy of M.K. Davis. Source: tinyurl.com/jlrmcks

Some particularly exciting recent evidence comes in the form of footage obtained by Davis himself while exploring the forests of Northern California. He discovered a series of giant footprints, quite possible Bigfoot tracks; we’ve embedded one of his videos below, highlighting their depth, size and number. At the time, he didn’t notice it, but when revisiting his images and videos from the trip, Davis spotted what appeared to be mucus in one of the footprints (see image, left). Quite unfortunately, his hand ended up getting in contact with the sputum, which seems to have lead to a drawn-out illness lasting several weeks (with strange symptoms continuing for beyond that months); yet, I’d like to think that if it weren’t for Mr. Davis getting his hands dirty and picking up all that mud and leaves out of the track, he probably would have never noticed those lovely secretions! So at least there’s a bright side. (As a personal side note: if the secretions did indeed lead to M.K. Davis’ illness, the implication is that Bigfoot is likely to be genetically similar to us, since DNA-similarity is required for transfer of disease…just a thought.)

In any case, we don’t want to give away too much of the interview or his articles – click on the player below to listen to the full recorded show!

Over and Out (and spread the word about)!





Posted on February 12, 2016 and filed under SUM2.